Making & tinkering is in the DNA of Seeed. Apart from our internal hackathons, some Seeeders are also embracing parts and bits off hours by our own when we get inspirations. To share our tinkering with the community, here we are: a new column Making at Seeed is live.

The projects we’ll share in this new column might be really entry-level, but we just want to share to learn. So please don’t hesitate to leave comments or suggestions as your inputs and feedbacks will help us do better.

So, today we’ll have Eman from our Branding Team sharing her making story of how to make a Firefly Lamp.

Hello community, I’m Eman, a Graphic Designer at Seeed.
I still remember how beatiful the fireflies were the first time I saw them when I was a little girl visiting my grandparents who lived in the countryside. But it has been a really long time since then as it was rare to see these beautiful creatures due to the environemtal pollution.
To re-create the stunning memory of these sparkle flying beauties, I thought it would be great to make a Firefly Lamp by using some open source technologies.
As fireflies spark with green light, making a Firefly Lamp was very nature to me. So I drew the scatch of the lamp of a wooden base and a transparent glass can. I also got a Grove Green LED light, a recorder, and a speaker. It didn’t take me so much time to connect all these Grove parts to a Seeeduino, as the standarlized connectors did enable me to enjoy the plug-and-play experience.
Then I used the recorder to record the prelude of Garden in the Ceiling (a song of my favorite Janpanese Band World’s End Girlfriend). This piece was full of sound of windbell and dog barking, very summer to me.
The next thing I did was to set up the structure of the lamp. Putting the LED into a glass can that I bought online, mounting other electronic parts under a wooden box as the lamp’s base were not difficult for me. However, using laser cutter to make the wooden box and drilling a hole for the switch were not easy when it came to machine tools. Also I spent some time on drilling a hole on the glass can too, so the wire connected to the LED could go through. When all the structure was completed, I grabbed some leaves from a tree (not-a-good-behavior, don’t mimic) and put them into the can to hide the LED and wire. Now, the lamp was perferctly finished.

Hope you all enjoyed my Firefly Lamp. If you did recall your childhood at countryside of catching fireflies into the glass can when you saw the lamp, I couldn’t be happier.
PS. A huge THANK YOU to my colleague CY, another designer at Seeed for tutoring me how to use the #Grove Starter Kit.
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