Grove - PIR Motion Sensor

Grove - PIR Motion Sensor

SKU 101020020
7.90
50+ Available
$7.90/ 1pcs+

Description

This is a simple to use PIR(Passive Infrared) motion sensor with Grove compatible interface. Simply connect it to Stem shield and program it, when anyone moves in its detecting range, the sensor outputs HIGH on its SIG pin.


The detecting range and response speed can be adjusted by 2 potentiometers soldered on its circuit board, The response speed is from 0.3s - 25s, and max 6 meters of detecting range.


Specification

  • Grove compatible interface

  • Voltage range: 3V–5V

  • 2.0cm x 4.0cm twig module

  • Detecting angle: 120 degree

  • Detecting distance: max 6m  (3m by default)

  • Adjustable detecting distance and holding time


Application Ideas

  • Motion sensor

  • Thief-guarding System

  • Switch

  • Industrial automation


Documents

For all Grove users (especially beginners), we provide you guidance PDF documents. Please download and read through Preface - Getting Started and Introduction to Grove before your using of the product.


Note

Potentiometers are not included.

Technical Details

Dimensions40mm x 20mm x 15mm
WeightG.W 12g    
BatteryExclude
Voltage range 3V–5V
Detecting angle 120 degree
Detecting distance max 6m (3m by default)

Part List

Grove - PIR Motion Sensor1

ECCN/HTS

ECCN6A002.a.3.f
HSCODE9031900090

Certification

RoHSCompliant

Reviews

Questions and Answers

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0
Trying to use with Linkit One and Base Shield v2 but only high voltage gets all the time.... what do I'm missing?
on Oct 19,2016
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It is an IR sensor. To be able to get a meaningful signal, it must be placed where the background IR is low enough that it doesn't trigger the sensor board (or the optional resistors and pots must be attached and they must be adjusted to reduce the sensor's sensitivity below the background level. To test the sensor, connect and power it, read it out. It will probably be responding to your body, your computers, etc. Place a blanket in the freezer for 15 minutes, then wrap the sensor in it and place an inverted (empty) drawer over the wrapped sensor. This should produce a low signal. (You could also just stuff the sensor in the freezer and shut the door!) If you don't get a low signal, check your wiring! Once you've achieved a low (indicating that it is not "seeing" enough IR to trigger the output) you can expose it to more light or a warm body, and it should respond. PIR sensors are used indoors, usually in unoccupied rooms, so that, when a person enters, it will see they are present by the IR (light emitted from their bodies by body heat) and turn on lights. Simulate this environment to test it.
on Jun 20,2017 23:20 PM
Reply upvote ()
It is an IR sensor. To be able to get a meaningful signal, it must be placed where the background IR is low enough that it doesn't trigger the sensor board (or the optional resistors and pots must be attached and they must be adjusted to reduce the sensor's sensitivity below the background level. To test the sensor, connect and power it, read it out. It will probably be responding to your body, your computers, etc. Place a blanket in the freezer for 15 minutes, then wrap the sensor in it and place an inverted (empty) drawer over the wrapped sensor. This should produce a low signal. (You could also just stuff the sensor in the freezer and shut the door!) If you don't get a low signal, check your wiring! Once you've achieved a low (indicating that it is not "seeing" enough IR to trigger the output) you can expose it to more light or a warm body, and it should respond. PIR sensors are used indoors, usually in unoccupied rooms, so that, when a person enters, it will see they are present by the IR (light emitted from their bodies by body heat) and turn on lights. Simulate this environment to test it.
on Jun 20,2017 23:20 PM
Reply upvote ()
It is an IR sensor. To be able to get a meaningful signal, it must be placed where the background IR is low enough that it doesn't trigger the sensor board (or the optional resistors and pots must be attached and they must be adjusted to reduce the sensor's sensitivity below the background level. To test the sensor, connect and power it, read it out. It will probably be responding to your body, your computers, etc. Place a blanket in the freezer for 15 minutes, then wrap the sensor in it and place an inverted (empty) drawer over the wrapped sensor. This should produce a low signal. (You could also just stuff the sensor in the freezer and shut the door!) If you don't get a low signal, check your wiring! Once you've achieved a low (indicating that it is not "seeing" enough IR to trigger the output) you can expose it to more light or a warm body, and it should respond. PIR sensors are used indoors, usually in unoccupied rooms, so that, when a person enters, it will see they are present by the IR (light emitted from their bodies by body heat) and turn on lights. Simulate this environment to test it.
on Jun 20,2017 23:20 PM
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0
I wish to mount this PIR sensor outside in a waterproof box. Can you please advise what kind of material can be used to cover the sensor that doesnt interfere with the passive infrared and is still suitable for outside (i.e. waterproof and U.V. light stable).
on Apr 11,2017
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Hi there~We have tested it for you, and the transparent plastic box will be OK.Regards
on Apr 25,2018 08:00 AM
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0
Hi this pcb nin there is a friend who has a drawing pc too?
on Mar 20,2017
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Hi there~ Sorry, could you please tell us more about your problem, I don't get your point.Regards
on Apr 25,2018 08:02 AM
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0
Hello, I wish to adjust the distance of detection. I have to add a potentiometer. where do I have to solder the potentiometer on the board? and witch value? Thank you very much
on Apr 22,2018
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Hi there~ You can refer to the PDF file of v1.2. And please pay attention to the notice. As you can see, you should add a potentiometer near the lens. This one is for distance control. If you still have problem, please contact our email. Regards ========================================================================= techsupport@seeed.cc
on Apr 23,2018 11:52 AM
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0
Can you re-add the dials from the 1.1 version? It's nearly impossible to solder R6 to add delay and without that it fires rapidly when used on a Wio + IFTTT
on Dec 24,2017
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Hi there~ You can download the Eagle file of V1.1 from here # https://github.com/SeeedDocument/Grove_PIR_Motion_Sensor/blob/master/resources/Grove_-_PIR_Motion_Sensor_Eagle_File.zip # Regards
on Dec 26,2017 09:45 AM
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0
Hi, if I implement this PIR sensor on the car that will move around, will the sensor sense the movement of the car without any human here?
on Oct 19,2016
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This is a PIR sensor. It indicates the Presence of IR (Infrared light). It has settings that can be controlled, to make it more sensitive or less sensitive, but it doesn't differentiate anything but the amount of IR within it's "View". This view is a 120-degree cone which has its point at the center of the white 'dome', and extends from the board on the dome side. All sources of IR within that cone will be focused onto the element in the sensor, and will be summed (contributing by the square law: double the distance, the received IR will be cut in half.) The sensor board can be adjusted for sensitivity, which allows some compensation for IR sources in the background. However, that assumes the IR sources are not changing, and aren't moving around. The sensor integrates the heat from the entire surface (visible to the sensor) along with every other heat source to produce the analog signal, which is run through a comparator to provide the output signal. That means the entrance of two large dogs could be 'recognized' as the entrance of a single human. Also, if an IR source is brought into the view, the sensor would always indicate a presence, regardless of how many people came or went. Basically, because of the need to control the environment, the PIR sensor is meant for use indoors. It is easily fooled, even then, by a heating register/radiator, hot plate, electric kettle, etc. Likewise, it doesn't have a mechanism to recognize the entrance of more than one person. Placing a PIR sensor on a car will expose it to many IR emittors: People, animals, car engines and exhaust systems, the Sun's rays (which carry considerable IR), Industry, trains... and it will be difficult to sense any single thing or person. Additionally, if you set it so it can recognize the presence of one human added to the IR flux from the sun at noon, a cloud will easily drop the background IR flux so adding a human to the scene will not trigger the sensor... In short, whatever you want to use an IR sensor for on a car is unlikely to work, and another sensor type should be considered.
on Jun 20,2017 23:13 PM
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0
Another nice box-mountable sensor that NEEDs pin connectors on the backside (or out to the side).
on Oct 19,2016
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Hi there~ You can consider this one.Regards ========================================================================= https://www.seeedstudio.com/PIR-Motion-Sensor-Large-Lens-version-p-1976.html
on Apr 25,2018 08:08 AM
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0
Hi, I've the PIR sensor v1.1b . I would know some things: The distance trimmer is too sensitive near the "limit" zone. There is like 1/20 turn between nothing revealed, and continuous high signals. Which CdS photoresistor (how big) should I connect to
on Oct 19,2016
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Hi there~ Please check our wiki, we have noted the distance and delay_time. As for the dimensions please check the pads on the PCB file.Regards. ======================================================================== https://github.com/SeeedDocument/Grove_PIR_Motion_Sensor/raw/master/res/Grove_-_PIR_Motion_Sensor_Eagle_Fil_v1_1.zip
on Apr 25,2018 08:24 AM
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0
Is this usable outdoors? I'm worried specifically about rainwater.
on Oct 19,2016
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Hi Richard.Yu can use it outdoors,but take some measures to prevent water is unavoidable.
on Oct 20,2016 10:44 AM
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You can use it outdoors in a suitable enclosure, which must either be transparent to IR light, or have a hole that the sensor can "look" through. If the hole is just the size of the dome, you can place it with RTV around the edge of the hole which seals the hole to the sides of the dome. Note that outdoor use will be affected by ambient IR sources: the Sun, passing cars (usually the exhaust systems, but also engines) and other motor-vehicles, groups of animals, groups of children, etc.
on Jun 20,2017 23:23 PM
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0
Works fine. I just wish the grove connector was horizontal or on the opposite side of the sensor. As it is now, it's impossible to mount the sensor behind a cover in an attractive way.
on Oct 19,2016
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Hi there~ We have the Grove - mini PIR motion sensor which will meet your needs. Have fun with it. ========================================================================= https://www.seeedstudio.com/Grove-mini-PIR-motion-sensor-p-2930.html
on Apr 25,2018 08:26 AM
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    Grove - PIR Motion Sensor

    SKU 101020020
    $7.90
    50+ Available
    $7.90/ 1pcs+
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