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      Grove - PIR Motion Sensor

      Grove - PIR Motion Sensor

      SKU 101020020
      $8.90
      50+ Available
      $8.90/1pcs+
      $8.01/10pcs+
      $7.57/20pcs+
      $7.12/50pcs+
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      Description

      This is a simple to use PIR motion sensor with Grove compatible interface. Simply connect it to Stem shield and program it, when anyone moves in its detecting range, the sensor outputs HIGH on its SIG pin.

      The detecting range and response speed can be adjusted by 2 potentiometers soldered on its circuit board, The response speed is from 0.3s - 25s, and max 6 meters of detecting range.


      Specification

      • Grove compatible interface

      • Voltage range: 3V–5V

      • 2.0cm x 4.0cm twig module

      • Detecting angle: 120 degree

      • Detecting distance: max 6m  (3m by default)

      • Adjustable detecting distance and holding time


      Application Ideas

      • Motion sensor

      • Thief-guarding System

      • Switch

      • Industrial automation


      Documents

      For all Grove users (especially beginners), we provide you guidance PDF documents. Please download and read through Preface - Getting StartedandIntroduction to Grove before your using of the product.

      Please visit our wiki page for more info about this product. It will be appreciated if  you can help us improve the documents, add more demo code or tutorials. For technical support, please post your questions to our forum.


      Note

      Potentiometers are not included.

      Technical Details

      Dimensions40mm x 20mm x 15mm
      WeightG.W 10g    
      BatteryExclude
      Voltage range3V–5V
      Detecting angle120 degree
      Detecting distancemax 6m (3m by default)

      Part List

      Grove - PIR Motion Sensor1

      Reviews

      Questions and Answers

      SUBMIT
      0

      Trying to use with Linkit One and Base Shield v2 but only high voltage gets all the time.... what do I'm missing?

      on Oct 19,2016
      Replyupvote ()
      It is an IR sensor. To be able to get a meaningful signal, it must be placed where the background IR is low enough that it doesn't trigger the sensor board (or the optional resistors and pots must be attached and they must be adjusted to reduce the sensor's sensitivity below the background level.To test the sensor, connect and power it, read it out. It will probably be responding to your body, your computers, etc. Place a blanket in the freezer for 15 minutes, then wrap the sensor in it and place an inverted (empty) drawer over the wrapped sensor. This should produce a low signal. (You could also just stuff the sensor in the freezer and shut the door!) If you don't get a low signal, check your wiring!Once you've achieved a low (indicating that it is not "seeing" enough IR to trigger the output) you can expose it to more light or a warm body, and it should respond.PIR sensors are used indoors, usually in unoccupied rooms, so that, when a person enters, it will see they are present by the IR (light emitted from their bodies by body heat) and turn on lights. Simulate this environment to test it.
      on Jun 20,2017 23:20 PM
      Replyupvote ()
      It is an IR sensor. To be able to get a meaningful signal, it must be placed where the background IR is low enough that it doesn't trigger the sensor board (or the optional resistors and pots must be attached and they must be adjusted to reduce the sensor's sensitivity below the background level.To test the sensor, connect and power it, read it out. It will probably be responding to your body, your computers, etc. Place a blanket in the freezer for 15 minutes, then wrap the sensor in it and place an inverted (empty) drawer over the wrapped sensor. This should produce a low signal. (You could also just stuff the sensor in the freezer and shut the door!) If you don't get a low signal, check your wiring!Once you've achieved a low (indicating that it is not "seeing" enough IR to trigger the output) you can expose it to more light or a warm body, and it should respond.PIR sensors are used indoors, usually in unoccupied rooms, so that, when a person enters, it will see they are present by the IR (light emitted from their bodies by body heat) and turn on lights. Simulate this environment to test it.
      on Jun 20,2017 23:20 PM
      Replyupvote ()
      It is an IR sensor. To be able to get a meaningful signal, it must be placed where the background IR is low enough that it doesn't trigger the sensor board (or the optional resistors and pots must be attached and they must be adjusted to reduce the sensor's sensitivity below the background level.To test the sensor, connect and power it, read it out. It will probably be responding to your body, your computers, etc. Place a blanket in the freezer for 15 minutes, then wrap the sensor in it and place an inverted (empty) drawer over the wrapped sensor. This should produce a low signal. (You could also just stuff the sensor in the freezer and shut the door!) If you don't get a low signal, check your wiring!Once you've achieved a low (indicating that it is not "seeing" enough IR to trigger the output) you can expose it to more light or a warm body, and it should respond.PIR sensors are used indoors, usually in unoccupied rooms, so that, when a person enters, it will see they are present by the IR (light emitted from their bodies by body heat) and turn on lights. Simulate this environment to test it.
      on Jun 20,2017 23:20 PM
      Replyupvote ()
      Reply
      0
      Hi this pcb nin there is a friend who has a drawing pc too?
      on Mar 20,2017
      Replyupvote ()
      0

      Hi, if I implement this PIR sensor on the car that will move around, will the sensor sense the movement of the car without any human here?

      on Oct 19,2016
      Replyupvote ()
      This is a PIR sensor. It indicates the Presence of IR (Infrared light). It has settings that can be controlled, to make it more sensitive or less sensitive, but it doesn't differentiate anything but the amount of IR within it's "View". This view is a 120-degree cone which has its point at the center of the white 'dome', and extends from the board on the dome side. All sources of IR within that cone will be focused onto the element in the sensor, and will be summed (contributing by the square law: double the distance, the received IR will be cut in half.)The sensor board can be adjusted for sensitivity, which allows some compensation for IR sources in the background. However, that assumes the IR sources are not changing, and aren't moving around. The sensor integrates the heat from the entire surface (visible to the sensor) along with every other heat source to produce the analog signal, which is run through a comparator to provide the output signal. That means the entrance of two large dogs could be 'recognized' as the entrance of a single human. Also, if an IR source is brought into the view, the sensor would always indicate a presence, regardless of how many people came or went.Basically, because of the need to control the environment, the PIR sensor is meant for use indoors. It is easily fooled, even then, by a heating register/radiator, hot plate, electric kettle, etc. Likewise, it doesn't have a mechanism to recognize the entrance of more than one person.Placing a PIR sensor on a car will expose it to many IR emittors: People, animals, car engines and exhaust systems, the Sun's rays (which carry considerable IR), Industry, trains... and it will be difficult to sense any single thing or person. Additionally, if you set it so it can recognize the presence of one human added to the IR flux from the sun at noon, a cloud will easily drop the background IR flux so adding a human to the scene will not trigger the sensor...In short, whatever you want to use an IR sensor for on a car is unlikely to work, and another sensor type should be considered.
      on Jun 20,2017 23:13 PM
      Replyupvote ()
      Reply
      0

      Is this usable outdoors? I'm worried specifically about rainwater.

      on Oct 19,2016
      Replyupvote ()
      <p>Hi Richard.Yu can use it outdoors,but take some measures to prevent water is unavoidable.</p>
      on Oct 20,2016 10:44 AM
      Replyupvote ()
      You can use it outdoors in a suitable enclosure, which must either be transparent to IR light, or have a hole that the sensor can &quot;look&quot; through. If the hole is just the size of the dome, you can place it with RTV around the edge of the hole which seals the hole to the sides of the dome.Note that outdoor use will be affected by ambient IR sources: the Sun, passing cars (usually the exhaust systems, but also engines) and other motor-vehicles, groups of animals, groups of children, etc.
      on Jun 20,2017 23:23 PM
      Replyupvote ()
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      0

      hi
      I have a PIR motion sesnor version 1.1b
      I'm curious about one of the Specifications
      the Detecting angle: 120 degree
      it means the sensing range is in front of the sensor? above the sensor?or both of them?
      this is not clear in the speci

      on Oct 19,2016
      Replyupvote ()
      <p>You can see a white guy onto the board,the sensing range is in front of the guy(vertical direction of the board).</p>
      on Oct 20,2016 10:47 AM
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      Reply
      0

      Hi there. Can this be set up to provide a close to a voltage free contact? Ie. replace a dry contact doorbell which currently has zero volts to simply close a circuit? If not do you have pair which can do this? Thanks in advance

      on Oct 19,2016
      Replyupvote ()
      <p>Hi,Dear.You mean to use PIR Motion Sensor instead of ordinary doorbell button, when close to the PIR Motion Sensor, the bell will ring?If so, you also need to plus a relay to control Sensor.</p>
      on Oct 20,2016 10:43 AM
      Replyupvote ()
      Reply
      0

      Hi, is it possible to adjust sensitivity to about 1 meter?

      Thanks

      on Oct 19,2016
      Replyupvote ()
      <p>Hi if you view the WIKI there was told you Measuring Range is 0.1m to 6m. So it is can work on 1m.</p>
      on Oct 20,2016 10:41 AM
      Replyupvote ()
      Reply

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        Grove - PIR Motion Sensor

        SKU 101020020
        $8.90
        50+ Available
        ADD TO CART
        $8.90/1pcs+
        $8.01/10pcs+
        $7.57/20pcs+
        $7.12/50pcs+
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